CLAO eNews: A Member Communications Bulletin February 2015

In This Issue:

CLAO/CLSA CONTACT LENS EDUCATIONAL SUMMIT

CLAO and the Contact Lens Society of America are partnering to present a contact lens educational program on Saturday, May 2, 2015 in Denver, CO at the Warwick Hotel. Here is an outline of this exceptional educational program:
9:30-10:45 Progress for Presbyopia: From Contact Lens to Intraocular Lens
Moderator: Deborah S. Jacobs, M.D.
Principles: depth of focus and multifocality
Aspheric and multifocal soft lenses
Aspheric and multifocal GP and hybrid lenses
Stein Lecture: Advances in IOL’s
11:00-12:15 Top Choices for Tricky Topography
Moderator Carri Ferguson, COT, FCLSA
Latest and greatest soft lens designs
Hybrids – what is the sweet spot for this modality
Oblate: UhOh! Options/approaches for post PK, post LASIK, Post Intacs
Minisclerals and Sclerals
Rapid Fire Cases
12:15-1:15 Lunch
1:15-2:15 Around the world: Update from ECLSO, SOBLEC and JCLS
Moderator Bruce H. Koffler, M.D.
2:15-3:45 CL and The Healthy Ocular Surface
Moderator Deepinder K. Dhaliwal, M.D.
New options in DX of OSD
New options in the Tx of OSD
CL selection for dry eye patient
Patient safety and education initiatives from: FDA, CDC, UK
Dabezies Lecture: What really matters
3:45-4:00 Adjournment & Refreshments

Continuing educational credits are being applied for (CME, COPE, NCLE, JCAHPO). For additional information and to register for the meeting, visit www.clao.org. If you need hotel accommodations while in Denver, a block of rooms is reserved at the rate of $199/night plus tax. This rate is available through April 9, 2015 by calling 1-800-525-2888. Please reference CLAO when reserving your room to receive this special rate.

EYE AND CONTACT LENS SYMPOSIUM ON MYOPIA EPIDEMIC AND MYOPIA PROGRESSION

Nearly 42% of the US population (age 12-54) are myopic, an increase of nearly 20% since the 1970s. Meanwhile, the refractive error is increasing substantially (Vitale et al, 2009). Seeing this trend in their practices, ophthalmologists and optometrists are seeking the most current information on treatments to correct and slow myopia progression. In response, Eye & Contact Lens, CLAO’s peer-reviewed journal, is sponsoring a 2-hour symposium on Myopia Epidemic and Myopia Progression, on Saturday afternoon, May 2, 2015, at the Warwick Denver Hotel.

The symposium will update and raise awareness among ophthalmologists and optometrists on myopia epidemic, myopia control, the safety of orthokeratology, and new treatment models and options. The symposium will include a series of invited speakers who are experts in their topics, concluding with a moderated panel discussion. All invited speakers will produce an evidence-based review article on their topic for publication together in an upcoming special theme issue of Eye & Contact Lens. Stay tuned for further details to the ECL (http://journals.lww.com/claojournal) and CLAO (www.clao.org) web sites.

CLAO SYMPOSIUM AT ASCRS

CLAO will be holding a symposium at the ASCRS Annual Meeting in San Diego, CA on Monday, April 20, 2015, in Room 6D, from1:00 – 2:30 pm. The title of the Symposium is “Myopia: Can Progression be Halted? Incorporating the 2015 Richard L. Lindstrom, MD Lecture.”

High myopia is epidemic in certain parts of the world. In this symposium, we will focus on the current understanding of development of myopia and techniques to control progression. Speakers will discuss pharmacologic intervention (including dilute atropine drops), corneal reshaping with contact lenses, contact lens fitting (to decrease peripheral defocus), and surgical options. Only evidence-based treatment options will be presented and international speakers will be included. Here is a summary of the presentations:

Moderators: Deepinder K. Dhaliwal, MD, L.Ac and Deborah S. Jacobs, MD
Emmetropization, Epidemiology and Genetics of Myopia — Natalie Afshari, MD
What’s the Problem with Being Myopic? Morbidity Associated with Myopia — Sumitra Khandelwal, MD
Play Outside! The role of Environmental Factors in the Development of Myopia — Minas Coroneo MD
Which Glasses are Better for Myopic Children? — Shira Robbins, MD
Daily-wear Contact Lenses Are Better for Myopic Children — Deborah S Jacobs, MD
Overnight Contact Lenses Are Better for Myopic Children — Lance Forstot MD
Introduction of the Richard L. Lindstrom Lecture — Deepinder K. Dhaliwal, MD, L.Ac
Richard L. Lindstrom. MD, Lecture: The Use of Atropine for Myopia Prevention — Donald Tan, MD, FRCS(Ed), FRCOphth

CDC PROMOTING HEALTHY CONTACT LENS WEAR AND CARE

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and partners are promoting healthy contact lens wear and care through social media during the week of March 2-6, 2015. The social media outreach occurs just prior to many universities’ Spring Break period as a way to make contact lens wearers aware of poor contact lens hygiene habits that can arise during vacations and times of travel. The target audience is older teens and young adults, a group at increased risk of contact lens-related eye infections due to poor hygiene habits. Key messages are also appropriate for contact lens wearers of all ages and include:

  • Take contact lenses out before bed, even when up late or traveling (unless your eye care provider tells you otherwise).
  • Bring enough contact lens supplies and a spare pair of glasses when traveling.
  • Never swim or shower in contact lenses.
  • All contact lenses require a prescription from an eye care provider. Never buy decorative contact lenses from illegal vendors.

    Eye care providers, public health organizations, contact lens industry, family, friends, and eye health advocates are all critical partners in relaying campaign messages and materials to contact lens wearers. CDC has developed a number of materials for partners to promote Spring Break contact lens health tips on social media:

  • Social media posts
  • Campaign announcement
  • Posters and web buttons
  • Web-based resource list

For more information and resources for promoting healthy contact lens wear and care, visit www.cdc.gov/contactlenses.

MEDICAL INDUSTRY NEWS

Information in this section has been provided to CLAO by press releases, online sources and other means. CLAO does not warranty its accuracy; nor does notice in this section constitute an endorsement by CLAO.

The AMA has developed a telemedicine resource that covers coverage and payment issues associated with telemedicine. This document may be found at https://download.ama-assn.org/resources/doc/cms/x-pub/coverage-payment-telemedicine.pdf

CMELIST.COM resources are available for ophthalmologists preparing for board certification or re-certification at CMEList.com. Ophthalmologists will find several excellent Board Reviews at the Ophthalmology Board Reviews section of CMEList.com, http://www.cmelist.com/board_reviews.htm#Ophthalmology-Board-Reviews. In addition, those Ophthalmologists completing CME requirements will find additional CME activities on the Ophthalmology Page, http://www.cmelist.com/ophth.htm. CMEList.com, www.cmelist.com/list.htm, now has links to more than 325 Online CME sites offering more than 16,000 CME courses and more than 26,000 hours of CME credit in over 50 medical areas. The List is updated regularly as new online CME sites and courses become available. There is no charge for accessing the List and no registration is required.

IACLE’s Fellowship Exam, held every two years, will next take place in November 2015. Successful candidates can then apply to become Fellows of IACLE and use the affix FIACLE in recognition of their contact lens knowledge. All IACLE members are eligible to sit the exam but must serve a minimum of 12 months before becoming Fellows. IACLE members have exclusive access to a 10-module Distance Learning Program (DLP) which is delivered online via the association’s website, www.iacle.org. Existing Fellows can also complete the program and re-sit the Fellowship exam as many times as they wish, to refresh their knowledge and keep abreast of the latest contact lens developments.

Looking for a way to disinfect a contact lens with direct UV light without harming the lens, researchers designed a new contact lens inset case and a device to deliver UV light to that inset case. Subjected to an in vitro test, the UV device produced an average log reduction of over 3.5 log of Acanthamoeba cysts when the lens and solution inside of the inset case was irradiated with 130 mJ per cm2 of UV or greater. After 30 cycles of 130 mJ per cm2 UV dose each, no gross changes were observed in mechanical properties or cytotoxicity tests in any soft contact lenses tested. American Journal of Ophthalmology, September 2014

The Charles T. Campbell Ophthalmic Microbiology Laboratory at UPMC, Pittsburgh, PA is a clinical microbiology laboratory dedicated solely to the diagnosis of infectious diseases of the eye. Our dedicated laboratory, which opened in 1973, is fully certified by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, the College of American Pathologists, and the federal government (CLIA). The clinical laboratory does not depend on research sources for operation and all testing is billable for insurance reimbursement. The goal is to provide pertinent information to assist ophthalmologists and physicians of all specialties in the treatment of eye infections. The laboratory’s endeavors include providing information on the best testing methods for detecting ocular pathogens, current antibiotic susceptibility data, and standard antibiotic therapies of ocular infections. Quick Links: Sending Specimens | Lab Requisition

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is working to educate patients in regard to contact lens safety and care. On the EPA website is a document entitled, "Do You Wear Contact Lenses? – There’s Something You Should Know…" It covers information on Acanthamoeba based on data from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). To view this document (it is in easy to read question and answer format) visit http://water.epa.gov/action/advisories/acanthamoeba/index.cfm

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is urging ophthalmologists to report occurrences of adverse patient reactions caused by decorative contact lenses to its MedWatch program. The FDA is emphasizing the need to report adverse reactions, especially if the lenses were purchased without a prescription, as the agency can only take action against illegal sellers when violations are reported. Consumers can report decorative lens-related problems directly to their local FDA Consumer Complaint Coordinator.

PRODUCT/INDUSTRY NEWS

Information in this section has been provided to CLAO by press releases, online sources and other means. CLAO does not warranty its accuracy; nor does notice of a product in this section constitute an endorsement by CLAO.

Alcon has sponsored a digital supplement entitled “Ocular Surface Health in Contact Lens Wear.” To view this supplement visit http://www.clspectrum.com/content/alcon/19/index.html

Allergan “At Your Service” has been created with your needs in mind. You ask the questions, we provide the answers—fast! Call At Your Service at 1-844-4-MyAllergan whenever you need information or assistance related to Allergan brands. Medical Information Specials are available Monday through Friday from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm (excluding holidays) to help answer patients’ questions.

Bausch and Lomb, Inc. has sponsored a supplement to Contact Lens Spectrum entitled “Breaking the Cycle of Discomfort.” To view this supplement visit http://www.clspectrum.com/content/bl/5/index.html

Blanchard Contact Lenses is offering a series of scleral lens fitting workshops entitled “Beyond the Limbus: Highly Specialized Scleral Lens Fitting” during 2015. These one-day workshops will be taking place in twelve major city locations. For more information on dates and locations visit http://visioncareprofessionalemail.com/portal/public/ViewCommInBrowser.jsp?kdnBFFNeuPRE9MB4jXVjUDxufO1JYalrPJt8pBTESB8vwGIQMFyKRk9YoRNrsuJr55pcuAsL9M7O2v7xtSw4Sw%3D%3DA or www.Blanchardlab.com or call 800-367-4009.

Metro Optics is introducing the Comfort Kone© Keratokonus Aspheric Quick Fit System. For more information visit http://www.metro-optics.com/ or call (800) 223-1858.

X-Cel Contacts is a custom soft and gas permeable specialty contact lens manufacturer. We partner with our doctors to deliver solutions that help solve the most complicated patient's visual needs. Our in-office consultation services are designed specifically to help guide doctors through the entire process of fitting patients in our lens designs at no charge to you. Utilizing decades of industry experience and custom contact lens expertise, X-Cel Contacts goes beyond the norm to assist you in finding a solution for those hard to fit patients, offering unparalleled customer service, with one goal in sight - a happy patient. We are more than just a custom contact lens manufacturer. We are your partner and together, we can change lives. Learn More About X-Cel's In-Office Consultation and Staff Training for our Atlantis Scleral design. Call me today. Allison Penn, 404-921-4467 or apenn@walman.coX-Cel Contacts is a custom soft and gas permeable specialty contact lens manufacturer. We partner with our doctors to deliver solutions that help solve the most complicated patient's visual needs. Our in-office consultation services are designed specifically to help guide doctors through the entire process of fitting patients in our lens designs at no charge to you. Utilizing decades of industry experience and custom contact lens expertise, X-Cel Contacts goes beyond the norm to assist you in finding a solution for those hard to fit patients, offering unparalleled customer service, with one goal in sight - a happy patient. We are more than just a custom contact lens manufacturer. We are your partner and together, we can change lives. Learn More About X-Cel's In-Office Consultation and Staff Training for our Atlantis Scleral design. Call me today. Allison Penn, 404-921-4467 or apenn@walman.com

CLX System and My Vision Express announced on January 6, 2015 integration upgrades to improve contact lens management. CLX, a contact lens ordering and management system, and My Vision Express (MVE), a practice management and electronic health record (EHR) system, have integrated system upgrades that leverage cloud-based technology to help eye care professionals (ECPs) streamline contact lens ordering, tracking, and marketing, from any computer in the practice. “This integration not only simplifies ordering for MVE users, but also grants them access to the powerful reporting and marketing features of CLX 2.0,” says Jeremy Bono, CLX product manager. “These features include the Price Check Report, an updated “on-line” competitive pricing comparison to help users improve profitability; the Contact Lens Recall Report, a tool ECPs use to easily identify and contact patients due for lens reorders or re-examinations; and, numerous additional reports that can detail annual supplies sold, and most profitable modalities. Best of all, fitting metrics can be broken down by doctor, office and staff member, making the integrated features with MVE ideal for large or multi-office practices.” About My Vision Express: The My Vision Express® practice management and certified electronic health record (EHR) software is a complete system that scales easily from single-office to multi-location eye care practices. Features include an innovative point-of-sale (POS), patient communications, patient portal, diagnostic equipment integration, insurance billing, and powerful inventory management features. For more information or a demonstration personalized for your practice, please call us toll-free at 1-877-882-7455, email our sales team at sales@MyVisionExpress.com, visit us online at www.MyVisionExpress.com or contact CLX Product Manager Jeremy Bono at jeremy.bono@optiport.com or (314) 743-0781 x2339.

MARK YOUR CALENDAR

The American Academy of Ophthalmology will be holding its annual meeting in Las Vegas, NV, November 14 – 17, 2015. For more information visit www.aao.org
The American Academy of Orthokeratology and Myopia Control (AAOMC) will be holding its “Vision By Design 2015” meeting on April 16-19, 2015 in Houston, Texas at the Westin Galleria. For more information and to register visit www.orthokmeeting.com
The American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons will be holding its annual meeting in San Diego, CA on April 17-21. For more information visit www.ascrs.org.
The Asia Cornea Society will be hosting its 4th Biennial Scientific Meeting in Taipei, Taiwan on December 11-12, 2014. For additional information visit www.acs2014.tw
The European Society of Ophthalmology (ECLSO) will be holding its 45th Congress in Izmir (Turkey) on October 16-17, 2015. For more information visit their website at www.eclso.eu. Or contact the ECLSO via email at insc-eclso@europa-organisation.com The Japan Contact Lens Society (JCLS) will be holding its annual meeting in Osaka on July 11-12, 2015.
The Singapore National Eye Centre will be celebrating the 25th Anniversary of its International Meeting on 22-24 May 2015 which will be held at Suntec Singapore Convention and Exhibition Centre. For more information visit www.snec.com.sg

CLAO “Did You Know?”

An article in the Sunday, January 11, 2015 issue of Contact Lenses Today reported that a Scientific Poster presented at the recent American Academy of Optometry Annual Meeting entitled “Factors in the success of new contact lens (CL) wearer retention,” by Anna Sulley, BSc, MCOptom, FAAO; Graeme Young, PhD, FCOptom, FAAO; and Chris Hunt, MSc, presented data on when and why new contact lens wearers discontinue wearing their lenses. “Of 534 patients at 29 sites throughout the United Kingdom, 74% were still wearing contact lenses after 12 months. Of the 136 lapsed wearers, one in four (25%) discontinued during the first 30 days and almost half (47%) within 60 days. The most common reasons for discontinuation included poor vision (32%), discomfort (17%) and difficulty with handling (15%). In 32% of the cases, the reason for drop-out was unknown. Significant factors in the likelihood of discontinuing CL wear included: subject age (older), sphere power (lower) and lens design. For 71% of the drop-outs, no alternative lens or strategy was attempted by the practitioner. This information could be beneficial to clinicians seeking to improve their patients’ retention rate, particularly in the first 60 days of lens wear.”

Contact Lens Event Reporting:
To report adverse contact lens reactions: http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/medwatch/ or call (800) FDA-1088.

To report possible grievances related to the Fairness to Contact Lens Consumers Act or the associated Contact Lens Rule: https://www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov/.

Contact CLAO:
CLAO, 4000 Legato Road, Suite #700, Fairfax, VA. 22033
Phone: 855-264-8818 Fax: 703-434-3003 Email: eyes@clao.org
Web: www.clao.org, and www.ContactLensDocs.com